Home > Uncategorized > “the Constitutional Convention of 1787 was in fact an illegal coup d’état” ~ Conspiracy in Philadelphia by Gary North

“the Constitutional Convention of 1787 was in fact an illegal coup d’état” ~ Conspiracy in Philadelphia by Gary North

The book’s thesis is, even for me, controversial. I provide 400+ pages of evidence that the Constitutional Convention of 1787 was in fact an illegal coup d’état. The participants knew this. This is why they took a lifetime oath of secrecy, walked upstairs to the second floor of the State House (so that eavesdroppers could not report what was going on), closed the doors, and hammered out the design for a replacement government. Newspaper reporters were excluded.

These men had been authorized by Congress and by several state legislatures only to revise the Articles of Confederation (1781), but not replace them. Knowing full well that they planned to replace the Articles with a new form of government, the leaders of the Convention nevertheless agreed to the terms laid down by the state legislatures, and then went off to Philadelphia to begin the first stage of a political revolution.

The story of this second American revolution is not told in the public school textbooks or in the “Christian America” seminars that are dear to the hearts of Christian home schoolers.

But what about Verna Hall’s book, A Christian History of the Constitution? Its documentation ends in 1774. It is also worth noting that the book was edited by her colleague, Joseph Montgomery, who was a Christian Scientist. Why did he edit it? Because Miss Hall was a Christian Scientist at the time she began compiling her book. I discuss this little-known background in my book.

In 1787, the states, with one exception (Rhode Island), were explicitly based on faith in God. In most cases, elected state representatives were required to swear their belief in the Trinity. The new Constitution made all such oaths illegal for Federal office (Article VI, Clause III). By means of the 14th Amendment (1868), the U.S. Supreme Court has applied this prohibition to state governments, completing the transformation in the case of Torcasso v. Watkins (1961).

I told this story 15 years ago. In response, the silence has been deafening. The “Christian America” promoters have steadfastly avoided any reference to my 1989 book. So, I decided to create a stand-alone volume, add more documentation, put a title on it that might break through this wall of silence, and give it away.

You can download your copy here:

via Conspiracy in Philadelphia by Gary North.

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