Home > Uncategorized > The Real DiLorenzo: A ‘Southern Partisan’ Interview (Thomas Dilorenzo “…Our Republic Cannot Be Restored Until GOP Destroyed”!)

The Real DiLorenzo: A ‘Southern Partisan’ Interview (Thomas Dilorenzo “…Our Republic Cannot Be Restored Until GOP Destroyed”!)

What will become of the Republicans?

The way I see it is that the Republican Party is returning to its Lincolnian roots. For the whole nineteenth century, the Republican Party was the party of big government! For the last half of the nineteenth century, the Jeffersonians were all Democrats. That’s why Southerners were all Democrats until about 20 years ago.

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That all changed with Woodrow Wilson, when he became a hyper-interventionist. Then FDR, of course, totally destroyed the Democratic Party as the party of limited government.

It’s ironic. Someone runs for president on a particular platform, then does the exact opposite when he gets in office. Lincoln, before the War, said, “I’m going to be hands off with the slavery issue.” Then he was the biggest interventionist ever. FDR ran, actually, on lower taxes —

A balanced budget, yeah.

And, of course, Clinton was going to be the most ethical administration in history.

Some historians call Lincoln a “master politician,” which I think he was. As I say in the book, that means he was a masterful liar, conniver, and manipulator. If Bill Clinton is a master politician, that’s what he is. If Franklin Roosevelt is a masterful politician, he’s a masterful liar, conniver, and manipulator. That’s what it means to be a masterful politician.

When the Partisan was being attacked during the Ashcroft nomination, the mainstream press lifted out certain quotations. One of them they lifted was where we were saying that. They left out the “if he was a masterful politician, then — ” part. They just said that we said, “Lincoln was a liar,” and that was one of the horrible things —

Well, it’s still true the way they wrote it. He was. He was a trial lawyer. His campaign wasn’t a campaign. He didn’t say a single thing, from the nomination to the general election. He was so tight-lipped that if he wrote anybody a personal letter, he would say in the letter, “Don’t tell anybody that I wrote you a letter, because they’re going to ask if I said anything about public policy.” That’s the way he was.

That’s an awful thing to have a secretive dictator, for the president of the United States, not telling the public what he’s going to do, and then forcing them to do it through military conscription.

Do you think the War was inevitable?

Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of th...

Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States. Latviešu: Abrahams Linkolns, sešpadsmitais ASV prezidents. Српски / Srpski: Абрахам Линколн, шеснаести председник Сједињених Америчких Држава. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I think it was avoidable. It’s a controversial thing to say. People hate to think all that death was unnecessary, but it was avoidable if people stuck to Jefferson’s thinking on secession and the consent of the governed. If they would’ve let the Deep South go, they would’ve eventually reunited. That would’ve forced the North to be less aggressive with its economic plans, its grandiose Manifest Destiny to have an empire that would rival Great Britain’s. It would’ve calmed them down a great deal. It would’ve brought them to their senses, but they couldn’t tolerate that. So, they had to kill one out of every four adult white males in the South to get their way.

The New England Federalists threatened to secede, and had they done it, they would have been allowed to go in peace.

What they would’ve had to have done is compromise on the tariff, for one thing. The Republican Party, as soon as it got power, doubled the tariff rate, then it tripled it.

It stayed around 45 to 50 percent until 1913, when Woodrow Wilson introduced the income tax. That was part of the deal of the income tax. “We’ll reduce the tariff, if you vote for the income tax.”

In your book, you talk a lot about Northern racism — the idea that they didn’t want the expansion of slavery into the territories because they didn’t want blacks there. Then there’s the Northern attitude toward the Indians after the War. Do you get a lot of criticism for your book on the race question?

No. I can’t think of any criticism, just mostly people saying, “I never knew this.” Because, of course, the government schools don’t teach this.

The clear reason the Republicans gave, and Lincoln gave, for opposition to the extension of slavery was that they wanted to preserve the territories for the white race. They didn’t want competition for jobs from anybody: Irish immigrants or black people, free blacks or slaves or anybody.

Then there was also the three-fifths clause, which created the political issue that if slavery did go into the new territories that would’ve artificially inflated the Democratic Party’s congressional representation a little more. That’s what the big argument was about.

Lincoln was very clear on that. He made a speech saying that — that the reason he’s opposed to the extension of slavery was the political balance of North and South. It was unfair, he thought. That’s hardly a humanitarian reason.

In his first inaugural, he promised to support a constitutional amendment that would have forbidden the federal government from ever interfering with slavery. On the day he was inaugurated, he was willing to see slavery exist long past his own lifetime, as long as it didn’t come into the territories and skew the political balance so the Republican Party couldn’t have its way……

EXCERPT

via The Real DiLorenzo: A ‘Southern Partisan’ Interview.

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