Home > Uncategorized > The G.O.P.’s Existential Crisis (NYT version why we’re not actually in debt, and the GOP is dying)… “No, what we’re having is a political crisis, born of the fact that one of our two great political parties has reached the end of a 30-year road”

The G.O.P.’s Existential Crisis (NYT version why we’re not actually in debt, and the GOP is dying)… “No, what we’re having is a political crisis, born of the fact that one of our two great political parties has reached the end of a 30-year road”

The G.O.P.’s Existential Crisis (NYT version why we’re not actually in debt, and the GOP is dying)

 

The New York Times ^ | 12/13/2012 | Paul Krugman

 

Posted on Friday, December 14, 2012 12:38:35 PM by darrellmaurina

 

We are not having a debt crisis.

 

mussobama

mussobama (Photo credit: GunnyG1345)

 

It’s important to make this point, because I keep seeing articles about the “fiscal cliff” that do, in fact, describe it — often in the headline — as a debt crisis. But it isn’t. The U.S. government is having no trouble borrowing to cover its deficit. In fact, its borrowing costs are near historic lows. And even the confrontation over the debt ceiling that looms a few months from now if we do somehow manage to avoid going over the fiscal cliff isn’t really about debt.

 

 

No, what we’re having is a political crisis, born of the fact that one of our two great political parties has reached the end of a 30-year road. The modern Republican Party’s grand, radical agenda lies in ruins — but the party doesn’t know how to deal with that failure, and it retains enough power to do immense damage as it strikes out in frustration.

 

(SNIP)

 

Since the 1970s, the Republican Party has fallen increasingly under the influence of radical ideologues, whose goal is nothing less than the elimination of the welfare state — that is, the whole legacy of the New Deal and the Great Society.

 

(SNIP)

 

gophum

gophum (Photo credit: GunnyG1345)

 

The answer, for a long time, has involved two strategies. One is “starve the beast,” the idea of using tax cuts to reduce government revenue, then using the resulting lack of funds to force cuts in popular social programs.

 

(snip)

 

Arguably more important in conservative thinking, however, was the notion that the G.O.P. could exploit other sources of strength — white resentment, working-class dislike of social change, tough talk on national security — to build overwhelming political dominance, at which point the dismantling of the welfare state could proceed freely.

 

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com …

 

via The G.O.P.’s Existential Crisis (NYT version why we’re not actually in debt, and the GOP is dying).

 

 

 

 

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