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How Psychiatry Went Crazy: The “bible” of psychiatric diagnosis shapes—and deforms—both treatment…

How Psychiatry Went Crazy: The “bible” of psychiatric diagnosis shapes—and deforms—both treatment…

Wall Street Journal ^ | May 17, 2013 | CAROL TAVRIS

Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2013 3:33:46 PM by neverdem

 

The “bible” of psychiatric diagnosis shapes—and deforms—both treatment and policy…

–snip–

The DSM-III (1980) was an effort to jettison outdated theories and terms such as “neurosis” and replace them with an objective list of disorders with agreed-upon symptoms. The DSM-IIIR (1987) was 567 pages and included nearly 300 disorders. The DSM-IV (1994, slightly revised in 2000) was 900 pages and contained nearly 400 disorders.

The new DSM-5, with its modernized Arabic number, is 947 pages. It contains, along with serious mental illnesses, “binge-eating disorder” (whose symptoms include “eating when not feeling physically hungry”), “caffeine intoxication,” “parent-child relational problem” and my favorite, “antidepressant discontinuation syndrome.”

Now psychiatrists can treat the symptoms of going off antidepressants, which is good because the expanded criteria for many disorders allows doctors to prescribe antidepressants more often for more problems…

–snip–

And he was there when those scientific aspirations met reality and all hell broke loose. Mr. Greenberg gives us a front-row seat at the APA‘s annual meeting in 2011, when results of the field trials were reported. Field trials are intended to test the reliability of diagnostic criteria—meaning that two psychiatrists observing the same person’s symptoms should have a pretty good chance of agreeing on a diagnosis. But the results were dismal. Agreement on identifying even Major Depressive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder—what Mr. Greenberg calls the “Dodge Dart and Ford Falcon of the DSM, simple and reliable and ubiquitous” disorders—was low. Moreover, the field testing on patients failed miserably: 5,000 clinicians signed up to participate, 195 finished training for it, and only 70 enrolled any patients in trials. The APA tried to put a good spin on these numbers —”nearly 150 patients have joined the study”—ignoring, Mr. Greenberg notes, that their goal was 10,000. Only two months before the data had to be in,…

(Excerpt) Read more at online.wsj.com …

via How Psychiatry Went Crazy: The “bible” of psychiatric diagnosis shapes—and deforms—both treatment….

 

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  1. May 18, 2013 at 2:53 PM

    Reblogged this on GUNNY G UP: THE NEW GUNNY G BLOG, ETC. ! and commented:

    How Psychiatry Went Crazy: The “bible” of psychiatric diagnosis shapes—and deforms—both treatment…
    May 18, 2013 Gunny G Edit Leave a comment Go to comments

    How Psychiatry Went Crazy: The “bible” of psychiatric diagnosis shapes—and deforms—both treatment…

    Wall Street Journal ^ | May 17, 2013 | CAROL TAVRIS

    Posted on Saturday, May 18, 2013 3:33:46 PM by neverdem

    The “bible” of psychiatric diagnosis shapes—and deforms—both treatment and policy…

    –snip–

    The DSM-III (1980) was an effort to jettison outdated theories and terms such as “neurosis” and replace them with an objective list of disorders with agreed-upon symptoms. The DSM-IIIR (1987) was 567 pages and included nearly 300 disorders. The DSM-IV (1994, slightly revised in 2000) was 900 pages and contained nearly 400 disorders.

    The new DSM-5, with its modernized Arabic number, is 947 pages. It contains, along with serious mental illnesses, “binge-eating disorder” (whose symptoms include “eating when not feeling physically hungry”), “caffeine intoxication,” “parent-child relational problem” and my favorite, “antidepressant discontinuation syndrome.”

  2. genomega1
    May 18, 2013 at 2:56 PM

    Reblogged this on News You May Have Missed and commented:
    How Psychiatry Went Crazy: The “bible” of psychiatric diagnosis shapes—and deforms—both treatment…

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