Home > Uncategorized > Smedley Butler – The Mussolini Affair… “”My friend screamed as the child\’s body was crushed under the wheels of the machine. Mussolini put a hand on my friend\’s knee. \’It was only one life,\’ he told my friend. \’What is one life in the affairs of a State.\’\” \’~”

Smedley Butler – The Mussolini Affair… “”My friend screamed as the child\’s body was crushed under the wheels of the machine. Mussolini put a hand on my friend\’s knee. \’It was only one life,\’ he told my friend. \’What is one life in the affairs of a State.\’\” \’~”

(excerpt from chapter called \”To Hell with the Admirals\”)

By Hans Schmidt

A picture of a double medal of honor recipient...

A picture of a double medal of honor recipient . (Note that the light blue ribbons (at the top of his ribbon rack) appear almost white in this overexposed photo.) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

Denied the commandancy, Butler did not dig in for a prolonged sulk as major general manqué. In the letter in which he vowed to block Naval Academy rivals for the next fifteen years, he also alluded to a resilience that precluded anything like General Barnett\’s last stand as commander of the Pacific: \”We must keep our faces to the Sun and out of the shadow. Keep our tails up and go on and what ever comes of this, it will be for the best in the end.\” Several months later he was making up his mind to retire.

ourAmerica

ourAmerica (Photo credit: GunnyG1345)

He met with Arthur Burks for advice, after which Burks wrote him thoughtfully summarizing the pros and cons. Burks observed that \”the mental uncertainty which prompted you to ask me to that conference was totally unlike you, and came down in favor of early retirement and an offer fromJoseph Alber\’s lecture bureau.

 

Smedley had said that now he would never be commandant, and that the Corps was being ruined. Burks argued that he might stay in to try and save it. But there was the prospect of \”leaping\” from the \”top of the heap\” in the marines to \”a neighboring heap which may be higher, if your legs are springy enough-which they won\’t be at sixty four.\” And if Smedley were to succeed his father in Congress, he would \”be back in the driver~s seat,\” with no military regulations to hamper him.\’8

With what he thought was almost half his life ahead of him, Butler decided to retire. The decision preceded the Mussolini incident. Being beaten at the top rung of command politics did not, however, mean he would go out quietly. Now definitely an outsider in Corps and navy politics, he continued in command at Quantico and resumed his extracurricular public speeches. Recent developments freed him from careerist constraints and from any need to defer meticulously to superiors. Despite not going out of his way to foment trouble, this fragile situation soon broke down, and he again ran afoul of brittle and maladroit chiefs in the Hoover administration.

In a speech on \”how to prevent war\” delivered to the Philadelphia Contemporary Club in January 1931, Butler related an anecdote about Italian Prime Minister Benito Mussolini while making the point that \”mad-dog nations\” could not be trusted to honor disarmament agreements. Butler recounted a story told him by an unnamed friend who had been taken by Mussolini for a high-speed automobile ride through the Italian countryside, in the course of which the dictator ran down a child and did not bother even to slow down: \”My friend screamed as the child\’s body was crushed under the wheels of the machine. Mussolini put a hand on my friend\’s knee. \’It was only one life,\’ he told my friend. \’What is one life in the affairs of a State.\’\” \’~

The Italian government protested, Rome newspapers denounced the speech as \”insolent and ridiculous,\” and Mussolini…………….EXCERPT !!!!!!!!!!!!!

via Smedley Butler – The Mussolini Affair.

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isthisman

isthisman (Photo credit: GunnyG1345)

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