Home > Uncategorized > New Tracking Frontier: Your License Plates… (“…Until recently it was far too expensive for police to track the locations of innocent people… “)

New Tracking Frontier: Your License Plates… (“…Until recently it was far too expensive for police to track the locations of innocent people… “)

 

mussbama

mussbama (Photo credit: GunnyG1345)

 

For more than two years, the police in San Leandro, Calif., photographed Mike Katz-Lacabe’s Toyota Tercelalmost weekly. They have shots of it cruising along Estudillo Avenue near the library, parked at his friend’s house and near a coffee shop he likes. In one case, they snapped a photo of him and his two daughters getting out of a car in his driveway.

 

gophum

gophum (Photo credit: GunnyG1345)

 

 

 

Mr. Katz-Lacabe isn’t charged with, or suspected of, any crime. Local police are tracking his vehicle automatically, using cameras mounted on a patrol car that record every nearby vehicle—license plate, time and location.

 

“Why are they keeping all this data?” says Mr. Katz-Lacabe, who obtained the photos of his car through a public-records request. “I’ve done nothing wrong.”

 

Until recently it was far too expensive for police to track the locations of innocent people such as Mr. Katz-Lacabe. But as surveillance technologies decline in cost and grow in sophistication, police are rapidly adopting them. Private companies are joining, too. At least two start-up companies, both founded by “repo men”—specialists in repossessing cars or property from deadbeats—are currently deploying camera-equipped cars nationwide to photograph people’s license plates, hoping to profit from the data they collect.

 

ayersflag

ayersflag (Photo credit: GunnyG1345)

 

The rise of license-plate tracking is a case study in how storing and studying people’s everyday activities, even the seemingly mundane, has become the default rather than the exception. Cellphone-location data, online searches, credit-card purchases, social-network comments and more are gathered, mixed-and-matched, and stored in vast databases.

 

 

Data about a typical American is collected in more than 20 different ways during everyday activities, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis.

 

(Excerpt) Read more at online.wsj.com …

 

via New Tracking Frontier: Your License Plates.

 

 

 

 

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  1. October 2, 2012 at 9:13 AM | #1

    Reblogged this on CITIZEN.BLOGGER.1984+ GUNNY.G BLOG.EMAIL and commented:

    Until recently it was far too expensive for police to track the locations of innocent people such as Mr. Katz-Lacabe. But as surveillance technologies decline in cost and grow in sophistication, police are rapidly adopting them. Private companies are joining, too. At least two start-up companies, both founded by “repo men”—specialists in repossessing cars or property from deadbeats—are currently deploying camera-equipped cars nationwide to photograph people’s license plates, hoping to profit from the data they collect.

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