The Cultural Roots of Trumpism American Thinker.com ^ | January 23, 2018 | Geoffrey P. Hunt Posted on 1/23/2018, 10:45:45 AM by Kaslin President Donald Trump’s occasional unfiltered coarse cloudbursts belie a man who is enormously joyful, having an abundance of entertaining good humor easily expressed, fairly shared. Trump is having a ball, for good reasons.

The Cultural Roots of Trumpism
American Thinker.com ^ | January 23, 2018 | Geoffrey P. Hunt

Posted on 1/23/2018, 10:45:45 AM by Kaslin

President Donald Trump’s occasional unfiltered coarse cloudbursts belie a man who is enormously joyful, having an abundance of entertaining good humor easily expressed, fairly shared. Trump is having a ball, for good reasons.

Trump’s first year as president may have been the most extraordinary since the 1840s. While Trump has disrupted almost all presidential governance and communication norms, his tenure so far has produced capital market gains of some $7 trillion, spreading investment wealth to millions of regular Joes and Marys, while tax cuts have already distributed $3 billion in bonuses and wage hikes to over 2 million workers and counting.

The Trump-inspired American economic revival, accompanied by a cultural earthquake in newfound respect, self-esteem, and optimism for working-class citizens, rural and urban – ignored and maligned since the industrial heartland was eviscerated in the 1980s – matches the economic and territorial expansions under presidents John Tyler and James Polk.

Westward expansion, Manifest Destiny, abetted by industrial innovation from the telegraph to steam engines to sewing machines, ushered in the longest economic growth period in American history – 1841 to 1859.

The 1840s also propelled the American Renaissance in literature and art. The fabulous Hudson River School of landscape painting, originating around 1825, spawned two major shifts in the 1840s: landscapes capturing Easterners’ imagination about the West and illustrations of people in everyday scenes with the Americana backdrops. Perhaps the best practitioner of the new genre was George Caleb Bingham, portrait painter and politician, who lived most of his life in Missouri.

(Excerpt) Read more at americanthinker.com

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