A Famous Science Fiction Writer’s Descent Into Libertarian Madness (Robert Heinlein) The New Republic ^ | June 8, 2014 | By JEET HEER Posted on 11/18/2018, 9:15:19 PM by narses By JEET HEER June 8, 2014

A Famous Science Fiction Writer’s Descent Into Libertarian Madness (Robert Heinlein) The New Republic ^ | June 8, 2014 | By JEET HEER Posted on 11/18/2018, 9:15:19 PM by narses By JEET HEER June 8, 2014

A Famous Science Fiction Writer’s Descent Into Libertarian Madness (Robert Heinlein)
The New Republic ^ | June 8, 2014 | By JEET HEER 
Posted on 11/18/2018, 9:15:19 PM by narses
By JEET HEER June 8, 2014
The science-fiction writer Robert A. Heinlein once described himself as “a preacher with no church.” More accurately, he was a preacher with too many churches. Rare among the many intellectual gurus whose fame mushroomed in the 1960s, Heinlein was a beacon for hippies and hawks, libertarians and authoritarians, and many other contending faiths—but rarely at the same time. While America became increasingly liberal, he became increasingly right wing, and it hobbled his once-formidable imagination. His career, as a new biography inadvertently proves, is a case study in the literary perils of political extremism.
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